Archive for category Numérica

NUM 1083

Title: Música Coral Portuguesa do Século XX

Artist: Coro de Câmara de Lisboa

Composers: Fernando Lopes Graça, Luiz de Freitas Branco, Joly Braga Santos

The Coro de Câmara de Lisboa (Lisbon Chamber Choir) was founded in 1978, by Prof. Teresita Gutierrez Marques, as Lisbon National Conservatory’s chamber choir. The choir is formed by twenty young musicians who perform — a cappella or in collaboration with instrumental ensembles — portuguese and foreign works from the Renaissance to the 21st century. They have already performed several world premières.
The Choir has always been very active, maintaining an artistic level which is unanimously applauded by the public and the critics. They have performed all over Portugal and in the most important concert halls of Lisbon (Belém Cultural Centre, Gulbenkian Foundation, S. Luiz and Trindade Theatres, etc.), and has participated in the most significant cultural exhibitions (Capuchos and Sintra festivals, the Gulbenkian Festival of Ancient Music, Lisbon ’94 – European Capital of Culture, Expo ’98 – World Exposition of Lisbon, the International Festival of Organ in Lisbon, etc.).
Abroad, the Choir has also performed extensively. Invited by institutions such as the European Choir Federation, the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, the Fundação Oriente or the Ministries of Culture of Portugal, Spain and Cape Verde, to give a few examples, the Choir has sung, among other places, in Madrid, Cuenca, León, Seville, Sória, Vitoria (Spain), Paris, Strasbourg, Rouen, Caen, Mont. St. Michel (France), Brussels, Malines (Belgium), Amsterdam (the Netherlands), Rome, Bergamo, Biella, Bolzano, Novara, Trento, Turin, Verona (Italy), Bonn (Germany), Vienna (Austria), London (UK), Montréal (Canada), New York, Santa Barbara, San Diego, San José (USA), Belo Horizonte, Florianópolis, New Hamburg, Porto Alegre (Brazil), Montevideu (Uruguay), Buenos Aires (Argentina), Puebla (Mexico), Santiago de Cuba (Cuba), Macao and Cape Verde.
In its three participations in the International Choir Competition of Tolosa (Spain), Coro de Câmara de Lisboa has obtained a 1st and a 3 rd prize in the Polyphony class and two 2nd prizes in the Folksong category

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NEW RELEASE – NUM 1200 Chopin | 19 Waltzes

NUM 1200
CHOPIN – 19 WALTZES
António Victorino D’Almeida – piano

This present record, with the integral 19 Chopin Waltzes is, with no doubt, a great surprise and the pianist Hans Graf – Professor at the Superior Music School of Vienna – considered “unbelievable” the way Victorino D’Almeida got the time to combine his other multiple activities (…“in which the originality of his literary works are comparable to the phantasy of his movies and his compositions, which show his extraordinary personality”) with such a big pianistic work, remarkable for the “perfect grasp” of the instrument and the stilistic knowledge, both of the author (Chopin) and of each piece, always marked by the energy and the joy of life of this exceptional artist”.
A similar remark was made by the famous pianist Alfred Brendel in a letter written to Victorino D’Almeida.
Victorino D’Almeida gives us his own “reasons” for the issue of this record:
In the first place I wanted to homage my Portuguese piano Professor, Campos Coelho, whose teachings are always present and never forgoten, even during the years I’ve paused my pianist career. In the second place, I intended to give a response to the old fascination that I had for the “prodigious” world of the Chopin Waltzes, so often misunderstood.
As a matter of fact, I consider Chopin as a half-polish and half-french composer, but I think that the waltzes reveal much more his French heritage, and when I viewed “The Ball”, this remarkable picture by Ettore Scola, I decided to go to the “studio” to revive it in a certain way, through the interpretation of the 19 waltzes (which
I dedicated to Ettore Scola, “a certain Paris story…”).
In the third place, thanks to the great sound technician – José Manuel Fortes – who with his deep cultural skill and conscience produced this wonderfull work, that may never have existed otherwise.
Finally, I also dedicate this work to the Austrian Firm E.T.E., this to remember that due to the incentive of Erika Pluhar and the “Trio”, with herself and Peter Marinoff, I have returned to the piano concerts, though with a very different style of the repertory.

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NUM 1192

The 3rd and 4th Symphonies of
António Victorino D’Almeida
In the program notes to the published score of his 3rd Symphony,1 António Victorino D’Almeida refers to a saying attributed to Portugal’s King, Dom João II (ca. 1455-1495):  “there is the time of the owl, but there is also the time of the hawk”. The King’s quotation emerges in the context of an appraisal of experimentalism, where the hawk conjures the image of the sly, opportunistic predator (the composer of seductively sonorous but  undeveloped sketches), in contrast with the shrewd owl (the methodical craftsman who painstakingly constructs a complete work). Already this context speaks volumes about the perspective of a composer who attributes opus numbers to works  published in 2007 and 2009 (op. 142 (Symphony No. 3)  and op. 154 (Symphony No. 4), respectively)2: it is as though the composer wishes to confirm that the listener stands before a complete and carefully thought-out whole, presented in a four movement plan, as happens in both works recorded here – hence the name, symphony. But this term should also be understood in its most “ancient” sense (i.e., originating in Italy during the late Renaissance), where it implied a group of heterogeneous instruments playing sounds [-phonia] together [syn-]. In fact, it seems that by evoking this dialogue with tradition, D’Almeida provides a framework for the listener’s interaction with his music.3
Understanding “how time passes”4 is an extremely important issue, one that has shaped much of the music written in the twentieth century (and considering the Portuguese King’s astute observation, the problem has apparently been known to everyone else since at least the fifteenth century). Returning to the owl and the hawk, but this time, focusing on the temporal issue behind the King’s quote, may provide some insight for understanding the various kinds of time or the way musical time may function in D’Almeida’s music. In fact, there seems to be a careful utilization of both hawkish and “owl-like” approaches at work here, in order to construct an internal balance of “opposites.” Traditional multi-movement symphonic form lends its built-in contrasts: fast – slow – dance – fast. A D’Almeida symphony typically begins with a more complex (read: owl-like) first movement (although in these works, any real vestiges of sonata form are virtually eclipsed), is followed by a lush singing movement (which always manages to go “off the rails” here and there), proceeds to a wry (read: hawkish) dance (often a scherzo or waltz) and closes with the inevitable finale, typically acting as a counterbalance to the opening movement (though the finale of the Fourth Symphony is a noteworthy departure from the expectedly frantic closing speed).
If these contrasts are more or less inherited attributes,  then the way time passes within each of these movements is where the composer’s invention lies. As previously mentioned, the traditional sonata shapes (with all of their tonal implications) have been jettisoned for formal procedures akin to those in Stravinsky’s landmark piece, Symphonies of Wind Instruments (1921). In this work, the title “symphonies” refers to the three kinds of music that make up the piece, each with a different tempo and character. In Stravinksy, these are combined in order to form a new continuity, as the kind of music sounding at any given moment is interrupted by what follows, creating a kaleidoscopic form of changes.
Something similar happens in these symphonies by D’Almeida, which again summons the dynamic of the owl’s and hawk’s times. The Portuguese composer prefers to take some material, perhaps a sardonic scherzo (Sinfonia 3, III), an invented, nostalgic song recalling his youth (Sinfonia 4, IV), or even thematic material from his own incidental music for his film, A Culpa (Sinfonia 3, IV), and use it as the basis for his “temporal” variations within a movement. Aspects of the basic material will be re-worked in a variety of settings, where each successive version clashes in some way with the former’s tempo, harmonic world or musical texture (as though what follows presents us with a different kind of time). In this way, the composer creates a parade of coherent (read: owl-like) successions of seemingly opportunistic (read: hawkish) changes.
But, if the composer has let go of the sonata approach traditionally associated with symphonic movements, this parade of on-stage characters constantly changing their costumes does receive some structuring from two other  formal archetypes, namely, the broad arch-forms associated with more lyrical movements and rondo-forms. This achieves a bow in the direction of the classical masters: one cannot help but recall Haydn’s delicate movements when encountering D’Almeida’s indication, Allegretto, in Symphony 3, and Mozart’s loathing of symphonic Adagios seems aptly reflected in the absence of any prolonged stretches of lethargic music.
Large-scale, arched shapes are employed in both the dance movements (the 3rd movements of both symphonies recorded here), where, in the fourth symphony, for example, sinuous waltzing interrupts a more barbed Allegretto.  In the “slow” second movements (here, a Moderato and an Andante, respectively) the juxtaposition game from the opening movements continues, imbuing the entire time-span of the symphony with a certain higher-order unity that glides above the tumult of the surface changes of speed and character. Neither is the rondo limited only to the finale – instead, it permeates all stages of the formal parade. The traditional return has been substituted with the idea of the refrain, since, although characters may revisit the stage, there is almost always subtle variation in their orchestral guises, their written-out reappearances (to paraphrase Bartók, the time of the exact formal repetition has passed). But in D’Almeida’s music, the return itself partakes in the interplay of times, since one excellent way to sense the passing of time is by standing still – a feat accomplished musically by returning “to square one” and repeating the game all over again.  This heightens one’s awareness of the different juxtapositions and makes any changes all the more dramatic.
And finally, if the reader will indulge one last musing of an ornithological nature:  does all of this make António Victorino D’Almeida an owl that hunts by day or a hawk who flies by night?
Fredrick Gifford

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NUM 1191

Title:  Sinfonia nr 2 & Concertino


Artists: Festival Symphony Orchestra, Orquestra Sinfónica Portuguesa, Antonio Victorino D’Almeida

Composer: António Victorino D’Almeida

A portrait of António Victorino D’Almeida (with Jean Cocteau in the background)
“Talking about music is like dancing about architecture.”
When I first encountered this quotation, it was attributed to Jean Cocteau.  Since then, I have seen it ascribed to a different person nearly every time I encounter it.  (And if we were to confer with the nearly infinite source of disinformation the Internet is quickly evolving to become, I’m certain we could find the same quotation attached to any number of luminaries).  Whatever the case, the universality of the attribution speaks both to the inherent veracity of the statement as well as to the proclivity of culture to borrow and integrate good ideas.  It is not perchance then, that I have chosen this particular sentence to frame a small portrait of the music of António Victorino D’Almeida.
First, the choice of this quote by Cocteau raises a question about historical proximity.  The music of António Victorino D’Almeida included on this CD, although not literally contemporary with the modernism of Cocteau (the works recorded here were written after the French author’s death), immediately conjures the sound world associated with the Paris inhabited by Cocteau in the 1920’s and ‘30’s.  Any listener familiar with music from the French capital during the fist half of the twentieth century will no doubt share the composer’s sardonic grin as she encounters reminiscences of Debussy, Gershwin, Stravinsky, Ravel, Honegger, Prokofiev, Auric and maybe even Satie.  Such “reminiscences” are not mere quotation, but rather, the evocation of a style (or styles) and all the associated trappings.  It’s as though the composer clothes himself in the costumes and customs of a given stylistic world and then writes at least a few phrases of well-behaved music in it before moving onto his next stylistic “target.”
Then there is a line of thought centered around borrowing – Cocteau as the creative plunderer of Greek drama in La Machine Infernal, for instance. (In fact, the mechanical bubbling conjured by Cocteau’s title might seem a rather appropriate metaphor for the orchestral “factory”  encountered on the current recording, as the musicians toil away to make the high number of character changes take place so seamlessly).  Perhaps plunderer is too harsh a term, although it is difficult to resist the image of the French dramaturge as some sort of surrealist Giovanni Belzoni, penning his initials on the pyramids of Greek drama.  And Belzoni brings us back to the thread of cultural appropriation and borrowing – after all, where would the British Museum be without its obelisks?  That is to say, why shouldn’t António Victorino D’Almeida be able to export the styles of musical monuments from their original contexts and shape them to achieve his own creative ends?  In fact, the plurality of the composer’s borrowings is what drives his musical discourse.
Before the so-called post-modernist period, one typically spoke of collage or pastiche, and it seems that the satire implicit in the latter term (with all its echoes of Cocteau) is at the heart of D’Almeida’s endeavors.  How else could a “stinger” (the most crassly “closed” of closing gestures) seeming to come from a film of the Golden Era of Hollywood elide so smoothly with a continuation in the form of a gossamer texture evoking the “impressionist” aether? How does “Gershwin-like” Americana commingle so easily with Viennese waltzing? (Although I have latched onto Cocteau, it is clear that D’Almeida’s frame extends well beyond France).  The satire results from the new continuity created by these seeming mismatches.
Here we strike on another ray, one that stretches from Cocteau to António Victorino D’Almeida via that most double-edged of dramatic tools, parody.  Of course when we think of Cocteau, we mean dramatic parody. But with D’Almeida, we have two kinds of parody to deal with: musical and comedic parody (and with so many sharp edges, it’s unlikely that someone won’t get hurt…).  Musical parody refers to the very old practice of borrowing pre-existing music and composing with it, in order to create a new composition. Employed extensively by late-Medieval and Renaissance composers, many times this sort of borrowing involved the innocuous use of a four-part (sacred) motet to generate a 5-voice mass, for example.  But at times it played with the more flagrant integration of a popular chanson into the polyphonic texture of liturgical music, projecting the profane onto the sacred in a manner that bordered on sacrilege.  Of course, such a loaded technique was enthusiastically revived in the last century by the theatrical surrealists and musical “neo-classicists” working in Cocteau’s Paris, and continues to be echoed in D’Almeida’s music.
But D’almeida’s parody is not literally concerned with embedding known tunes into his textures, rather, his rapid-fire evocations of “profane” situations challenge the canonic form of the symphony as erudite concert music, in the vein of his modernist predecessors.  But in the Portuguese composer’s music, the challenge is not one to be taken lightly – in fact humor can be quite a serious matter.
At this junction with parody and humor, our train of thought must detour briefly towards another composer – one, no doubt, very close in spirit to D’Almeida – the American Charles Ives.  In Ives’s musical parodies (here the term applies in its literal sense), the religious hymn tunes that are set in counterpoint with patriotic numbers (at times quite comically) are done so, not to belittle the component sources, but in order to throw them into a new dialogue – a result akin to the effect of the juxtapositions in the music of António Victorino D’Almeida.
Yet another fleeting thought: we are struck by the multi-faceted approach to art in his vast output.  Here is a man who writes both original pieces as well as histories and criticism, makes films and retains the role of a personality in the story of his nation’s culture.  It is an observation that could apply equally to Cocteau as well as D’Almeida.
Still, the reader may protest, charging that I haven’t spoken directly about the music on this CD.  But that probably won’t bother the composer too much.  The main reason Cocteau’s provocative quote came to mind in the first place was a question of appropriateness (and here, the echoes of Igor Stravinsky, a great collaborator of Cocteau, are quite loud ), or rather, the lack of appropriateness of verbosity in the face of music whose discourse relies on experiencing the voyage of unexpected twists and turns into and out of nearly as many styles, speeds, keys and characters as the pieces have minutes.
And after saying all of this, what if I am mistaken – what if the incipit wasn’t even by Cocteau at all?
Fredrick Gifford

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NUM 1139

Title: Obras para violoncelo e piano

Artists: Jed Barahal, Christina Margotto

Composers: Luís de Freitas Branco, Fernando Lopes-Graça

Luís de Freitas Branco’s Sonata for Cello and Piano, composed in 1913, after his studies in Berlin, reveals the composer’s naturally classical tendencies and exemplifies his use of cyclical composition techniques associated with the aesthetics of César Franck.  In the unanimous opinion of musicologists and critics alike, it is one of the most remarkable works in the Portuguese chamber repertoire and, for this reason, a rare example of world-class Portuguese music.

Nowadays, however, a work achieves international recognition only if it has been successfully recorded by more than a few artists.

Apart from its intrinsic value, a musical score’s interpretation by several performers with different cultural backgrounds, and in diverse circumstances, is what will eventually reveal a work in all its dimensions, including the ones that the composer himself may have been unaware of.  That is why LFB chose to grant performers the greatest possible freedom of interpretation.

It is to exactly this degree that a competent and talented performer presents himself as a co-author or co-creator of a work that is only capable of fulfilling its potential through him.  The true greatness of a musical composition may remain obscure or never fully develop without the existence of a diversity of interpretations.  This means that it is essential to make known new interpretations by performers of as many different nationalities as possible.

For Portuguese music to get this kind of publicity, it is important, if not indispensable, that instrumentalists of other nationalities take an interest in a work and play it regularly.  Just imagine what Mozart’s Jupiter symphony would have been if during the last 200 years it had been performed by one or two Austrian orchestras and a handful of their conductors.  Even if the worthiness of a score is undeniably the first requirement for its acceptance by the public, it is still not the only requirement.  The existence of what I have called a “diversity of interpretations” is an extraordinarily relevant factor in our high-tech consumer society.

I was fortunate enough to have had the pleasure of hearing a wonderfully stirring live performance of this sonata – the best of all I have had the opportunity to hear in person – by the American cellist Jed Barahal and the Brazilian pianist Christina Margotto in a concert that was part of a series commemorating the 50th anniversary of LFB’s death.  From now on, the public will be able to hear this remarkable interpretation by Jed Barahal and Christina Margotto.  We owe our thanks for this project, first of all, to the dedication and artistic enthusiasm of two foreigners who, so much the better for us, have chosen to live in Portugal. Someone else, however, is also responsible for this CD’s existence: I am referring to my dear friend Maestro José Atalaya. This recording is the treasured fruit of the infinite love of a student for his departed master, as well as the result of a sustained and noble effort carried out over several decades by Maestro Atalaya in support of performing artists.  It is the consequence of something as rare as it is beautiful: the dual acknowledgment of a gift from the past and of the present.  Let us hope now that musical audiences will enjoy them both.”

João Maria de Freitas Branco

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NUM 1095

Title: Nova Musica Para Flauta Compositores Portugueses

Artists: Istvan Matuz, Jorge Salgado Correia & Helena Marinho

Composers: João Pedro Oliveira, António Chagas Rosa, Isabel Soveral, Tomás Henriques, Virgílio Melo, Sara Carvalho
João Pedro Oliveira, António Chagas Rosa, Isabel Soveral, Tomás Henriques, Virgílio Melo, Sara Carvalho

António Chagas Rosa
Born in Lisbon, he studied Piano at the Conservatório Nacional and History at the New University of Lisbon. From 1984 to 1987, with a scholarship from the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation of Lisbon, Chagas Rosa studied Contemporary Piano and Chamber Music with Alexander Hrisanide at the Sweelinck Conservatory in Amsterdam. Between 1987 and 1992, with a scholarship granted by the Portuguese government, he studied composition at the Rotterdams Conservatory under Klaas de Vries and Peter Jan Wagemans.
In The Netherlands, António Chagas Rosa worked as a repetiteur and assistant at the Dutch opera house, Het Muziektheater, and became a teacher of the opera class at the Sweelinck Conservatorium. Among other productions, he worked with Robert Wilson during for De Materie by Louis Andriessen, and with Oliver Knussen during the rehearsals of “Die Glückliche Hand”, by Arnold Schönberg. As a pianist he took part in many of the concerts organized by the Gaudeamus and “The Unanswered Question” foundations. In 1989, being invited by the dance group Dansproductie of Amsterdam, he performed music by John Cage for prepared piano in many Dutch cities as well as in London, Mulhouse and Ghent.
In 1994, the ACARTE department of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation commissioned him with the composition of the chamber opera “Canticles for the remission of hunger”, upon a libretto by the Portuguese writer Paulo Lages. Further commissions were provided by the International Music Festival of Macau, the Portuguese Radio (Antena 2), the Teatro Nacional de São Carlos in Lisbon, the Casa de Mateus Foundation, the Nederlands Kamerkoor, and many others.
His works have been performed in several modern music festivals in Portugal, Spain, France, Holland, Austria, Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, the U.S.A., Macau and Hong-Kong, etc. In 1997 he represented Portugal in the Tribune Intérnationale des Compositeurs (UNESCO) in Paris with his concerto for piano and orchestra. During the 1998 edition of Wien Modern , the Austrian ensemble Klangforum premiered Moh (commissioned by the Portuguese festival Music in November); this piece was also performed in Spain (Ensems, Valencia) and Portugal ( Serralves hall, in Porto) by the Remix Ensemble, with Stefan Asbury as conductor.
In 1999 and 2002 he was member of the juri of the Premio Valentino Bucchi Competition for Composition in Rome. In 2000 his song cycle Non Altro for tenor, piano and electronics was premiered at the Concertgebouw of Amsterdam, by Marcel Beekman and Hans Adolfsen. Several of his works are published in Portugal and Holland (Fermata, Musicoteca, Donemus), and there are recordings of his Piano Sonata, Altro for piccolo and piano (Numérica, Port.), and of 4 Cartoons for prepared marimba (Deux Elles, UK).
António Chagas Rosa’s latest opera – Melodias Estranhas – upon a libreto by the Dutch writer Gerrit Komrij, was the result of a joint commission made by the cities of Oporto and Rotterdam, European Capital of Culture in 2001. It tells three episodes of the life of the 16th century humanist philosopher Damião de Góis, student and friend of Erasmus of Rotterdam. Also a composer, he was accused by the Inquisition of writing inappropriate (polyfonic) music, imprisoned and later killed. The premiere of this opera took place at the Schouwburg of Rotterdam, as a joint production of Casa da Música (Oporto) and the Onafhankelijk Toneel of Rotterdam.
His most recent works include composisitons for the Nederlands Kamerkoor of Amsterdam, the Contemporary Music Group of Lisbon, the Portuguese percussion group Drumming and the Austrian Jeunesse Festival.
Since 1996 António Chagas Rosa teaches Chamber Music at the University of Aveiro (Portugal), at the Department of Communication and Arts.


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NUM 1103

Title: Stone Flowers

Artist: Sabiá Quartet

Composers:  Astor Piazzolla, Tom Jobim, Caetano Veloso, H. Villa-Lobos, Neuza Teixeira, Luiz Gonzaga

Feodor Kolpachnikov
Violoncelo
Mr Kolpachnikov was born in Moscow. He began his first cello lessons at age 5. In 1999 he received a concert diploma at the Tchaikovsky Conservatory and was a student of Maria Tchaikovskaia. He has participated in master classes with Leonid Gorochov, Karine Georgian, and Dimitri Jablonsky in Moskau as well as with Mike Roses in New York. Between 1996-1998, Mr Kolpachnikov was the solocellist * of the Moskau Symphonic Orchestra and in 1999 the solocellist * of the Orchestra of the Nations under the direction of Justus Franz. He has performed chamber music on tours in Germany, France, Mexico, South Korea, Japan, and Russia. In July of 1996, Mr Kolpachnikov was a soloist with the Summit Music Festival in New York playing the Haydn D major cello concert as well as the Dvorák b-minor cello concert. Since 2000, he has been the second solocellist* of the Orquestra Nacional of Porto.
Birgit Laude
Violin
Born in Frankfurt, Germany, Ms Laude began her violin studies at the Music University of Viena, continued at the International Cello Center in London, and completed her education with distinction at the University of Music and Arts Mozarteum in Salzburg.
She was first violin of the Aton Quartett (Schleswig-Holstein), played many concerts with the Junges Salzburger Klaviertrio and was a member of the Munich Philharmonic under the direction of Sergiu Celibidache. She has participated in many different chambers groups and as soloist in Switzerland, Italy, Austria, Egypt, Syria, Germany, U.S.A and South America. Since 1998, Ms Laude has been a member of the Sabia Quartet and a violin teacher at the Musik und Singschule Hilpoltoltstein (Germany).
Francisco Moreira
Viola & Acoustic Guitar
Born in Goiânia, Brazil, Mr Moreira began his musical studies at the Conservatory of the Federal University of Goiás, and finished at the University of Music and Arts Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria. He won two prizes in the Young Instrumental Competition in São Paulo, and was a member of the Youth Symphony Orchestra of Rio de Janeiro, the Youth Symphony Orchestra of Latin American “Jeunesse Musicales” Montevideo Uruguay, the Youth Symphony Orchestra World-wide “Jeunesse Musicales” Warsaw, Poland, the Mozarteum Orchestra in Salzburg, and the Salzburg Chamber Soloists. He has participated in master classes with Max Rostal, Bruno Giuranna as well as other professors in Austria, Spain, Brazil and Germany. He has also performed in several concerts and recordings with soloists Mischa Maisky, Jean-Pierre Rampal, Boris Belkin, among others. He has been a member of the National Orchestra of Porto and viola professor in the Conservatory of Music of Coimbra since 1994.
Andrea Moreira
Violin & Voice
Ms Moriera was born in Salzburg, Austria. She completed the course of Violin and Music Pedagogy at the University of Music and Arts Mozarteum in Salzburg. She was member of the Mozarteum ChamberOrchestra and participated during their tour of Mexico and Austria. Ms Moreira was also a member of the Quartet Zugalli as a violinist as well as a singer and has performed concerts in Austria, Germany, Brazil and Portugal. In 1996 she established a duo (performing as a singer and a violinist) with the pianist Anne Marie Mennet, making many concerts in Portugal. She has lived in Portugal since 1994 and is currently teaching violin at the Music Conservatories in Oporto.


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